Quantum Charlie

There is a chapter in Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (which Cary and I listen to all the time) that perfectly illustrates the key requirements of miracle creation. It’s when Charlie finds the Golden Ticket.

First requirement: Giving up.

By the time Charlie’s miracle occurs, he has thoroughly given up. His birthday bar of chocolate wasn’t a winner and neither was the bar bought for him with saved-up money by Grandpa. There is no hope left and what’s more, his situation is desperate: He and his family are starving. Not only is there no more chance of chocolate but there is no food. This is the space between stories.

Second requirement: Prayer.

When Charlie finds the 50p piece on the street, he knows he should take it home and feed his family with it. That’s what the tribulations of the world he lives in dictate and, in the context of starvation, it’s absurd to spend money from heaven on a chocolate bar. But he does, in a prayer to the universe that is strengthened by its faith and trust that another world is possible.

Third requirement: Flow

At the point when Charlie buys the bar, he has so thoroughly given up that all he can do is follow what’s true in the moment. He’s hungry, he’s found money, he’s passing a candy store, he buys a chocolate bar. And then, following what seems like desire, or intuition or, again, just the moment, he buys another one. He is in the zero point field, the black hole from which reality is created. He traverses the void in flow with his prayer and, of course, there is the Golden Ticket.

Then comes the exquisite chapter when Charlie tells his mother, father, and grandparents the news and the More Beautiful World comes into being, the world in which Grandpa Joe can walk and, eventually, Charlie inherits the whole Chocolate Factory. As Grandpa Joe says, “Yipppeee!”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s